Bootylicious

 

ugh

im hungry

but we/i have no milk, bread, eggs, microwave, energy, or motivation

She hated the namelessness of women in stories, as if they lived and died so that men could have metaphysical insights.

Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding  (via glittergheist)

(Source: fissionaccomplished)

basiacat:

bucky spending hours at that smithsonian exhibit, staring at everything, watching every single one of the little “newsreel” clips, getting escorted out of the museum because he’s the last one there, sir, you must not have heard our announcements, but we’re open at ten tomorrow

bucky going to the exhibit every single day for a week straight and that one older security guard is so nice to him, telling him in a low, conspiratory whisper one evening that he was there when the captain america costume got stolen by captain america himself, isn’t that just ridiculous? and you’re a dead ringer for sergeant barnes, son, you’d look good in that costume

bucky finally showing up on steve’s doorstep on a rainy evening – it’s a spacious old brownstone, sam up tippy-top, steve on the ground floor, nat in the basement – and he’d had a whole speech prepared and carefully memorized but when he sees steve’s shocked face it all crumbles and he just sort of scrambles to catch his breath, hands clenched tight in his coat pockets, prosthesis whirring, and steve just looks at him for a solid minute then tells him to come in, they’ll throw some couch cushions on the ground, it’ll be like old times, and bucky just breaks

it’s messy and it’s horrible and bucky wakes up screaming almost every night but steve is steady and solid and reassuring like he’s always been, and he asks natasha and bruce to help him find a psychologist after bucky confesses to him, barely whispering, that he thinks he needs some Help

steve being gentle with bucky because god it was hard enough to get thrown into the 21st century but getting tortured, electrocuted, tossed in and out of cryo, practically lobotomized––

steve being so fucking gentle when he helps bucky sort through his memories, starts telling him stories and leaving out details and watching that old grin slide across bucky’s face when he remembers something steve didn’t mention

steve and bucky going back to that smithsonian exhibit together on a slow, snowy wednesday morning when everyone’s at work and at school, taking their time, and there are a couple of moments where bucky starts to shut down but steve touches his shoulder or his back and they move through it together

running into that old security guard as they leave and when bucky winks at him, steve has to hide a grin because that’s absolutely the bucky that he grew up with

sometimes it’s a step forward and sometimes it’s three steps back; bucky is pretty sure the nightmares will be a constant for the rest of his life but that’s okay, because steve is there every time and–– -

well, to the end of the line, right?

ofdarklands:

portmanteaurian:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

this is the most aggressively misleading graph i have ever seen and i have seen some really fucking sneaky graphs

oh
ooohhh

ofdarklands:

portmanteaurian:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

this is the most aggressively misleading graph i have ever seen and i have seen some really fucking sneaky graphs

oh

ooohhh

showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.

Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.

(Source: showslow)

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. 

Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. 

After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. 

To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”

For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.

To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.

A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

TitarubiSurrounding David (2008)National Museum of SingaporeFrom here
Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.
When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.


This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Titarubi
Surrounding David (2008)
National Museum of Singapore
From here

Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.

When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.

This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.

mayordave:

WHOA THERE ARE JUST OVER 5K SIGNATURES NEEDED FOR THE PETITION TO REACH ITS GOAL WE’RE SO CLOSE
CMON CMON CMON WE’RE ALMOST THERE WE CAN DO THIS

mayordave:

WHOA THERE ARE JUST OVER 5K SIGNATURES NEEDED FOR THE PETITION TO REACH ITS GOAL WE’RE SO CLOSE

CMON CMON CMON WE’RE ALMOST THERE WE CAN DO THIS